Injectable Drug Stops HIV From Entering Cells

River D'Almeida, Ph.D
2 min readAug 24, 2020

Once in the body, HIV tracks down T cells that bear the CD4 receptor. It attaches to these immune cells, fusing itself with the T cell’s membrane before injecting its genetic material into the cell’s core. Next, the viral RNA is converted to a DNA format before the host cell’s machinery is hijacked to produce multiple new copies of the virus.

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River D'Almeida, Ph.D

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